A Guide to the Endless OS for Linux

Many find the idea of switching to Linux intimidating. Let’s face it: despite being the most-used operating system for servers, it’s yet to see major commercial and consumer use. This is mostly because there still aren’t many off-the-shelf computers that have Linux pre-installed, and most people don’t want to deal with the hassle of installing a new OS. After all, you’ll have to worry about so much more – most notably, app and driver compatibility.

A Guide to the Endless OS for Linux

Luckily, the latest version of Endless OS presents us with solutions to many of our concerns. Released on May 18, Endless OS 3.8.1 is the latest version of this Debian-based OS initially introduced to the public back in 2014. Like its previous versions, Endless OS 3.8.1 comes with a lot of digital literacy initiatives that make computing easier than ever before.

The Basic and Full versions

This particular OS comes in two different versions: Basic and Full. The Basic version is about 2GB in size to download. It is equipped with a handful of apps and is recommended for computers are likely to have constant and stable access to the internet. This basic version is perfect for those who haven’t tried Endless yet and are simply interested in taking a sneak peek.

Meanwhile, the Full version is a much larger download (the package goes up to 16GB) and requires at least 32 GB of free disk space. This version of the OS comes with over a hundred apps, such as games and productivity software, reference materials and educational resources. Since this version is packed with content right from the get-go, it is more ideal for computers that have limited to no internet connection.

Compatibility with apps

Despite rendering the internet as merely an optional feature – a move truly unheard of in this day and age of connectivity – Endless OS is, surprisingly, compatible with online applications that help enhance productivity and encourage learning.

For instance, for students and professionals, the popular file hosting platform Dropbox can be easily found in the Endless’s organized and functional App Store. Using the App Store is so easy – you don’t even need to log in or create an account. For designers, the Altium 365 Viewer is compatible with a range of browsers and can be used to share schematics and 3D designs with other users. For writers, avid readers and knowledge-seekers, the OS comes with a built-in offline app that has FlexBooks from the C-12 Foundation. The app also contains some content from Khan Academy and a number of videos covering a variety of subjects.

endless os

Narrowing the digital divide

The ongoing global health crisis has brought many things to light, including the wide digital divide in many countries across the globe. In China alone, the South China Morning Post noted how students in most rural areas have had to be provided with SIM cards equipped with free mobile internet data to ensure that they could transition to online learning.

Due to this phenomenon becoming a reality for many nations, affordable computing devices that do not demand a constant internet connection are even more important. The makers of Endless OS are very much aware of this need, which is why their OS is pre-installed in some low-cost laptops available in developing countries such as Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania.

In addition to this, they also launched their very own non-profit organization last month. The goal of Endless OS Foundation is to distribute computers to students with limited or no internet access to facilitate distance learning.

With its intuitive and easy-to-use interface and abundant offline applications, adjusting to a world primarily ruled by technology will definitely be easier for people from all walks of life with the help of Endless OS.

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9 Responses to “A Guide to the Endless OS for Linux

  • Very useful information I wanted to give more than 1 star but it saved my vote to quickly.
    I am a true fan of Linux and the many distributions.

  • Tony Babich
    2 months ago

    I had never heard of Endless OS until this article, interesting stuff,

     to ensure that they could transition to online learning.

    adding to this I’ve heard a lot of news from friends about telemedicine more recently. I’m wondering if you have any thoughts on the medical or iOT/IT services industries use of online medicine, managed IT services, etc.

  • a comment

  • Jari Hämäläinen
    2 months ago

    Is that version free or in which price?

    • Mike Schwab
      2 months ago

      Almost all versions of Linux are free to download and install. A few distributions offer support contracts for a low price.

  • Interesting project. I wonder how they are dealing with the accessibility features to make this flavor of Linux really inclusive. As a blind person I am finding the Linux world kind of forgetting about the disability groups. Based on my own experience, I dare to say that there are only 2 releases that allow a blind person to install their distribution with no sighted assistance Slin & Debian. Anyway, thanks for letting me know about this & I am going to get it as soon as possible.

  • Keith Riach
    1 month ago

    Thank you very much for your guide, a quick question – I am about to start teaching Linux to people in a retirement village. I think xubuntu (which really looks a lot like xp )
    Do you have any other suggestion please?

  • Keith Riach
    1 month ago

    Thank you – will take your advice!
    Keith

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